SDG 14 - Life below water

SDG 14

Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources

The world’s oceans – their temperature, chemistry, currents and life – drive global systems that make the Earth habitable for humankind. Our rainwater, drinking water, weather, climate, coastlines, much of our food, and even the oxygen in the air we breathe, are all ultimately provided and regulated by the sea. Throughout history, oceans and seas have been vital conduits for trade and transportation.

Careful management of this essential global resource is a key feature of a sustainable future. However, at the current time, there is a continuous deterioration of coastal waters owing to pollution and ocean acidification is having an adversarial effect on the functioning of ecosystems and biodiversity. This is also negatively impacting small scale fisheries.

Marine protected areas need to be effectively managed and well-resourced and regulations need to be put in place to reduce overfishing, marine pollution and ocean acidification.

Facts and Figures

  •     Oceans cover three quarters of the Earth’s surface, contain 97 per cent of the Earth’s water, and represent 99 per cent of the living space on the planet by volume.
  •     Over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods.
  •     Globally, the market value of marine and coastal resources and industries is estimated at $3 trillion per year or about 5 per cent of global GDP.
  •     Oceans contain nearly 200,000 identified species, but actual numbers may lie in the millions.
  •     Oceans absorb about 30 per cent of carbon dioxide produced by humans, buffering the impacts of global warming.
  •     Oceans serve as the world’s largest source of protein, with more than 3 billion people depending on the oceans as their primary source of protein
  •     Marine fisheries directly or indirectly employ over 200 million people.
  •     Subsidies for fishing are contributing to the rapid depletion of many fish species and are preventing efforts to save and restore global fisheries and related jobs, causing ocean fisheries to generate US$50 billion less per year than they could.
  •     Open Ocean sites show current levels of acidity have increased by 26 per cent since the start of the Industrial Revolution.
  •     Coastal waters are deteriorating due to pollution and eutrophication. Without concerted efforts, coastal eutrophication is expected to increase in 20 percent of large marine ecosystems by 2050

Space-based Technologies for SDG 14

SDG 14 aims to sustainably manage and protect water ecosystems. Satellite technology can provide valuable data on water levels and pollution. Through COPUOS, States discuss national, regional and international water-related activities. UNOOSA helps countries access satellite data for better management and protection of water resources. UNOOSA also brings together experts to discuss cooperation, capacity-building and future approaches to water resource management.
 

Learn more about the SDGs

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