Biodiversity & Ecosystems & Environmental Monitoring

“The contributions of space-based technologies and applications to support sustainable development are well recognized. Protecting nature and biodiversity specifically is of major importance in that context, especially in a period when climate change, population expansion and increased levels of wildlife crime among other factors are putting a significant pressure on biodiversity and wildlife globally. Many space technology solutions exist to support the management of ecosystems and to assess or study biodiversity and wildlife, in addition of course to the growing use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for example. Earth Observations and satellite-based positioning but also satellite telecommunications are being used in various projects around the Globe.” (UNOOSA, 2019)

"Biodiversity and Ecosystems Management". United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs, UNOOSA. 2019.
http://www.unoosa.org/oosa/en/ourwork/psa/emnrm/biodiversity.html.
Accessed February 21, 2019.

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Photo of Jiayun Huang

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