WASH

WASH stands for Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene and is the focus of SDG 6, which aims to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all (UN, n.d.). WASH incorporates many aspects from drinking water provision, water security, faecal sludge management, menstrual hygiene management, and water management. The aim for WASH service provision is for everyone to have access to "safely managed" drinking water, "safely managed" sanitation facilities and "basic" hygiene, as per the JMP definitions. However with 2.2 billions people still lacking access to safely managed drinking water and 4.2 billion lacking safely manged sanitation the world has a long way to go (UN, n.d.). 

 

 

Sources

United Nations, n.d., SDG 6, https://sdgs.un.org/goals/goal6. Accessed 23 July 2021. 

 

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Merci à Maria Nagui d'avoir traduit cet article volontairement.

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Event

Local Perspectives Case Studies

Stakeholder

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Person