Thermal Imagery

"Thermal sensors employ one or more internal temperature references for comparison with the detected radiation, so they can be related to absolute radiant temperature. The data are generally recorded on film and/or magnetic tape and the temperature resolution of current sensors can reach 0.1 °C. For analysis, an image of relative radiant temperatures (a thermogram) is depicted in grey levels, with warmer temperatures shown in light tones, and cooler temperatures in dark tones. Imagery which portrays relative temperature differences in their relative spatial locations are sufficient for most applications. Absolute temperature measurements may be calculated but require accurate calibration and measurement of the temperature references and detailed knowledge of the thermal properties of the target, geometric distortions, and radiometric effects. [...] Thermal imagery can be acquired during the day or night (because the radiation is emitted not reflected) and is used for a variety of applications such as military reconnaissance, disaster management (forest fire mapping), and heat loss monitoring." (Natural Resources Canada/Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, 2015)

Sources

"Thermal Imaging". Natural Resources Canada, Canada Centre for Remote Sensing. Last modified November 25, 2015.
https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geomatics/satellite-imagery-air-….
Accessed March 29, 2019.